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Submitted by jono on 11 Oct 2017.

Today sailed through the Raz de Sein, which has the most notorious current and overfalls on the French coast. A small gap next to the Pointe du Raz allowed a passage through on flat water. Then a long haul in open water, a few zigzags to get through the rocks off La Point de La Torche, and finally into the calmer waters of south Brittany. Good to get here! Video clip is of the current yesterday just after leaving Le Conquet, where it also burbles through quick.

Submitted by jono on 07 Oct 2017.

North Brittany. A truly beautiful coastline with many well protected bays. At low tide, rocks are everywhere. They form barriers that block or hide the route to the beaches. Navigationally confusing. The marked channels to get inside are welcome finds.

The currents - further out - tear east, then west, with a half-hour period of indecision in between. There's little point attempting to sail against them if the wind is light.

Submitted by jono on 05 Oct 2017.

Wind and rain for most of the day. Flat water, but too windy for comfort before the Héaux de Bréhat lighthouse. The lighthouse itself sits on a reef, so inside is protected. Beyond, the sea should have been a cauldron, but big tides - full moon tonight - turned the sea into a eastward flowing river, robbing the waves of their strength. Being lucky, still. 40nm nearer to Spain!

Exciting sailing.

Submitted by jono on 03 Oct 2017.

Short but nice video clip sailing away from Dinard (near St Malo), France. This after a great stop where without a plan things all came together, and the true spirit of humanity and collaboration shone through again. Thanks to Léo Lefebvre for being in the rubber boat and the iphone video work.
(Update: there are now two clips - click through to see the second one).

Submitted by jono on 28 Sep 2017.

Past the first of the D-day beaches. Their normality was perhaps what impacted most.

Emotions. Sadness: that we Brits were so willing to fall for the peace-time propaganda of Brexit. A pulse of anger too. And puzzlement: at the twisted priorities of those who seek to drive wedges with scant regard for Europe's greatest achievement: peace.

Those were my thoughts upon arriving at Juno beach, location where Canadian and British forces disembarked in 1944.

Submitted by jono on 25 Sep 2017.

Been a bit irregular on the blog posts lately but have managed a few Facebook updates. Remember to check here for those.

Submitted by jono on 18 Sep 2017.

First landing. Calais. Come a long way.

Submitted by jono on 16 Sep 2017.

Excellent day yesterday. Farewells to Robby at Royal Belgium Sailing Club. Then slipped past Zeebrugge - where windsurfers are prohibited from passing the port entrance. A headwind meant that the course across was oblique, so my tactic was to sail a long (long!) way out first, and then cross approaching from seaward, where I guessed I'd not be noticed until it was easier to let me pass than block passage. I know from experience going past Rotterdam that I don't show up on radar.